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Call for Sculptors!

Join other Vermont Snow Sculptors for The Flurry: Vermont's Sanctioned Snow Sculpting Competition from January 15-17 at Suicide Six Ski Area in Pomfret, Vermont.

Calling Beginning and Expert Snow Sculptors!

Maximum 3 people per team. 8 team maximum.

Suicide Six Ski Area, Pomfret, Vermont
Weather dependant. May be re-scheduled on short notice.

TO ENTER

Please send an email with the following information to communications@artistreevt.org.

1. Team members: Name, email, phone, town of residence.
2. Description of previous Sculpture experience if available
3. Ideas for Flurry sculpture
ABOUT THE EVENT
Join other snow sculpting teams competing to create large, stunning sculptures over a three-day period. Winners are chosen by fellow sculptors to decide who goes on to the Nationals in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin in February 2022.

Each team will receive a block of snow 6'wide x 6'deep x 8'high at the base of Suicide Six Ski Area. Each team's snow block will be chosen by a random lottery. Condition of the snow cannot be guaranteed. If snow is not available and snow-making is not possible, the event will be cancelled and the last attending team will go on to the Nationals.

All participants must register beforehand and will be screened daily for temperature/contact tracing at the outside tent on site (which will be next to the carving blocks).

Each block will be roped off for only the participants for social distanced work therein.

All work occurs outside and all participants must also comply with the Inn’s COVID procedures therein while on site.

RULES OF THE COMPETITION 
Each team shall consist of three members 18 years and older from the same state. Additional sculpting assistance is not allowed except that given by competition organizers and grounds crew. Amateurs and professionals are eligible. The final sculpture must fit within a 9' x 9' foot square, height is optional.

No media other than snow, ice or water may be used. Competitors to use snow available on site only. Colorants not allowed. Armatures or molded shapes are NOT allowed.

Sculptors may provide their own tools at their own risk and liability. Power tools are NOT permitted. 

JUDGING
The individual artists will judge the sculptures and winners will be determined based on these recommended criteria:

Creativity: Originality of expression (50%)
Technique:
Utilization of materials, excellence in execution and presentation. (30%)
Title & Message: Visual force of message. (20%) 

AWARDS
1st Place Vermont Flurry Award, Trophy and invitation to compete in US National sanctioned Snow Sculpting Competition in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
2nd Place - TBD
3rd Place - TBD
Vermont Flurry People's Choice Award (determined by public vote), TBD

Voting ends on Sunday, January 17th at 12:00 pm.
The winners will be announced on Sunday, January 17th 12:30-1 pm! 

Written by Jennifer Billock
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | FEBRUARY 16, 2016 | https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/snow-carvers-create-massive-sculptures-wisconsin-180958082/

Want to level up your own snowman game? Take a page out of a snow sculptor’s handbook. Competitors Steve Bateman, Wade Pier and Andrews share some of their best tips for creating snow art:

Defy expectations: The initial idea needs to be creative enough to grab someone’s attention. Bateman likes to create sculptures that challenge standard concepts of size and perception, because then people stop and look. From there, come up with either a detailed sketch or a to-scale model to reference during sculpting.

Get rid of the extras: Start by removing the big chunks of snow you know you won’t need. Or, as Pier (whose Alaska-based team sculpted an owl) puts it, “take out all the snow that doesn’t look like an owl.” Then move in to get the smaller surfaces and detail.

Use the right tools: Make sure your tools are sharp and go over every inch of snow—don’t leave any surface unfinished. You’ll know when you’re completely done because the snow will start to look like “marble or Styrofoam,” Bateman says.

Let go: Whether you’re in a competition or your front yard, snow sculptors all warn not to get too attached. After all, says Bateman, it’s just going to disappear. “It’s ephemeral art,” he concludes. “I don’t mind that it’s going to melt and go away. Nothing lasts anyway.”

In partnership with

Free and open to the public.

This event is weather-dependent and may be rescheduled on short notice.